Corporal Consequence Essay

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CORPORAL TREATMENT IN UNIVERSITIES IN

SOUTH ASIA

Submitted to the Committee on

the Rights in the Child

Time of General Discussion upon Violence Against Children

twenty eight September 2001

2

TABLE OF MATERIAL

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 3

I. INTRODUCTION 5

II. JUST HOW CHILDREN ARE TROUBLED BY CORPORAL 5

PUNISHMENT

installment payments on your 1 Risk for the Kid's Physical and Psychological Health 5 2 . 2 Effect on Retention and Learning Successes 6

III. LEGAL PLATFORM 7

a few. 1 The UN Convention on the Rights of the Kid (CRC)

as well as the CRC Committe 7

a few. 2 Nationwide Legislation Against Corporal Consequence in South Asia almost eight IV. DEL CUERPO PUNISHMENT IN SCHOOLS IN SOUTH ASIA 11

Versus. WHY CORPORALPUNISHMENT IN SOUTHERN ASIA? 12-15

5. you Fixed and Strong Electricity Relations 12-15

5. two The Home Environment 17

a few. 3 The college System in South Asia 18

VI. ADDRESSING THE MATTER 22

six. 1 Requirement for Judicial Change and Child-centred Learning twenty-two

6. 2 UNICEF System Activities in South Asia 23

VII. THE WAY AHEAD: AN AGENDA PERTAINING TO UNICEF twenty-five

REFERENCES 28

For further information contact:

Child Protection and Gender Section

UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia

Kathmandu, Nepal

Tel: + 977 – 1 517 082

E-mail: [email protected] org

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BUSINESS SUMMARY

Fisico punishment is a frequent phenomenon inside the daily life of South Hard anodized cookware children – at home, in schools, in places of work in addition to their neighbourhoods. Although little or no research is out there, testimonies via students, parents and educators, as well as cases reported inside the media, claim that corporal abuse is a common problem in many universities in the region. Not merely are kids physically and psychologically impacted by corporal consequence, violence in schools and fear of educators contributes significantly to kids dropping away of school. Some children go through a greater risk of corporal consequence due to their ethnic, family or class backdrop. Children with disabilities are usually more vulnerable to physical and psychological punishment. Corporal treatment in schools generally impacts both boys and girls, but young ladies are more vulnerable to sexual abuse than kids.

While the Convention on the Rights of the Kid (CRC) requirements that kids be respected as human beings with the right to dignity and physical sincerity, in To the south Asia corporal punishment can often be considered important to children's parental input, to facilitate learning and to instil willpower.

No single element accounts for the many forms of physical violence against children, including fisico punishment in schools. A variety of related social, educational and cultural factors contribute to the problem. The degree of sanctioned physical violence is relatively loaded with South Asia, as is shown in the high prevalence of violence against women and woman s. Physical violence in its many forms is often explained since deriving coming from unequal electricity relations. Structure and bumpy power associations are solid in To the south Asia and therefore are reflected inside the subordination of various castes, classes and ethnic groups, and in the oppres sion of and physical violence against selected groups.

The phenomenon of corporal consequence clearly shows and manifests children's insufficient power and the low sociable status within just society plus the family in the classroom. Children are generally seen as not ‘mature' plus the assumption is made that adults know finest and thus must make decisions about children's lives. The educator is considered a figure of authority whom must be obeyed while the college students should change and conform.

The lack of accountability towards children in To the south Asian schools is another element that plays a role in violence in schools and also to teachers utilizing corporal punishment. Crowded classrooms with limited infrastructure, inadequate learning tools, as well as the numbers of inexperienced teachers likewise contribute to elevated stress amongst teachers and subsequently to the frequent use of corporal consequence.

Governments have made some legal provisions regarding child misuse and corporal punishment but these are usually...

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twenty-eight

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